New Findings on Language Acquisition for Children with Autism

New findings published in Pediatrics by the Kennedy Krieger Institute’s Center for Autism and Related Disorders reveal that 70 percent of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) who have a history of severe language delay, achieved phrase or fluent speech by age eight. This suggests that more children presenting with ASD and severe language delay at age four can be expected to make notable language gains than was previously thought. Abnormalities in communication and language are a defining feature of ASD, yet prior research into the factors predicting the age and quality of speech attainment has been limited.

Autistic children with severe language delay achieve phrase or fluent speech by age eight.

This study, the largest of its type to date, examined which factors led to the development of “phrase utterance,” and which helped predict the rate of improvement (at what age). In general, Non-Verbal intelligence factors were the greatest predictor of this language development, and “social interest and engagement were as robust, if not greater, when predicting the age that children attained phrase speech and fluent speech,” said Ericka L. Wodka, Ph.D., a neuropsychologist in Kennedy Krieger.

About Sanford

Learning Disabilities specialist and Educational Consultant
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