University-Based Teacher Education: An Industry of Mediocrity

Photo credit: Nicholas Blechman

Well-done piece in NY Times about teacher preparation.

There are widespread holes in teacher preparation programs, including how reading is still taught with an emphasis on guessing instead of a more analytic and systematic approach.

How America prepares its teachers has been a subject of dismay for many years. In 2005 Arthur Levine, then the president of Teachers College at Columbia University, shocked colleagues (and himself, he says) with a scathing report concluding that teacher preparation programs “range from inadequate to appalling.” Since then the outcry has only gotten more vociferous. This summer the National Council on Teacher Quality described teacher education as still “an industry of mediocrity.”

Another missing component, reformers say, is sustained, intense classroom experience while being coached by masters of the profession. Too much student teaching is too superficial — less a serious apprenticeship than a drive-by. The Woodrow Wilson program, which has beachheads at 23 universities in four states, builds teacher training programs in partnership with local school districts, requires prospective teachers to spend a full year inside schools working alongside veterans, and provides three years of postgraduate mentoring in the classroom.

About Sanford

Learning Disabilities specialist and Educational Consultant
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