Learning Disabilities, Dyslexia? What’s your Preference, Pain or Pleasure?


The Sun or The Moon?

Sometimes I feel like a bit of a downer and in contrast to other popular LD-centered websites, because a fair amount of my writings, posts and presentations concerns the risks and vulnerabilities that can go along with having a learning disability or learning difference. It’s a little out of character it would seem, because those who know me, see that I’m a glass half full person and one who tends to look for and find positive aspects and opportunities in problems.

And, I’ll be the first to emphasize there’s a tremendous need for uplifting, inspirational and true information about upsides of struggle, and of promoting success stories related to dyslexia and learning differences. I hope and aspire to provide some of that as well. There are several great organizations that do just that. Dyslexic Advantage and Yale Center for Dyslexia and Creativity are two that come to mind right away.

While working for many years with children and adults with learning differences such as dyslexia, I’ve found that people with such differences and conditions need role models, they need hope and they need a sense of how to access strengths, gifts and talents that are either dormant and laying in potential wait, or even inherent in brain and learning differences. Thomas G. West writes eloquently and convincingly on this subject in his seminal book, In the Minds Eye and in his most recent one, Seeing What Others Cannot See

We each have to bring to the table what we know best, our selves and our stories. In my case, having worked in and consulted with schools for students with learning disabilities, and also in treatment center for children, teens and adults with primary emotional and behavioral challenges, I’ve seen first-hand the results of the trauma, shame and hidden isolation, which often accompany school struggles and repeated failures. The magnitude of scar tissue left behind can be deep, impactful, and long-lasting.

In fact, as an example, a few years back, the NIMH and Hazeldon, released statistics showing upwards of 60% of adolescents in residential treatment for substance abuse have learning disabilities. I have seen and experienced this overlap between school stress and mental health struggles in my own family. Even the great celebrities and success stories like Philip Schultz, a dyslexic adult and winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, have wounds that cut deep. The success stories show us what’s possible. They show us realized potential when opportunities arise. And all too often they show us people who’ve succeeded in spite of their school stories and not because of them.

For these reasons, it’s important to me to continue shedding light, and to help provide access for other voices, for the un-celebrated, and the less successful—those who are too often left in shadows or worse, in situations of despair and desperation.

So, where’s the fun in all this? Well, the pleasure is knowing that when we live in awareness of both sides of this coin, the upsides and the risks, the talents and possibilities and the scars and hidden trauma, we do our children and ourselves better service. Our children’s happiness can be enhanced when we don’t turn away from the shadows, indeed, that shadows dissipate with light.

Sanford Shapiro

About Sanford

Learning Disabilities specialist and Educational Consultant
This entry was posted in Discussion Topics, LD Support Sites, Learning Disabilities and Mental Health, Social Issues and Ideas. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Learning Disabilities, Dyslexia? What’s your Preference, Pain or Pleasure?

  1. Jamie Stone says:

    Bravo!

    • Sanford says:

      Thanks Jamie. I know you work with students with dyslexia and learning differences, and maybe have a personal connection as well. When you are speaking to people in your community, do you hit both sides, the potential, strengths and talents, but also the hidden and not so hidden trauma or social/emotional scarring?

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