Archive for the 'Education Issues and Ideas' Category

  1. Be Real This is the essence of connection. Inspiring kids and helping instill confidence isn’t about only being positive or trying to be inspirational. Being real and authentic is what gets you where you want to go with your kids. In any close and effective relationship, you must be brave in this way. […]

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Awareness of dyslexia, illiteracy and remediation continues to spread throughout the world. In this article, Nigeria: Easing Dyslexia in Children to Develop Full Potential, Director of Dyslexia Nigeria, Mrs. Adrienne Tikolo discusses illiteracy in Nigeria and efforts to train teachers. In Nigeria, most people don’t know of dyslexia. Most times when a child is struggling […]

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Sir Ken Robinson has famously spoken about the terrible lack of creativity in educational and intellectual society and institutions. He jokes with some degree of black humor that watching a disco full of Ph.D’s is to watch a group of disembodied heads, lacking a sense of kinesthetic, artistic and social/emotional competencies. He castigates our educational […]

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I’ve been working in the field of literacy and learning differences for a long time. And over the course of these years I became so good at helping students improve their weaknesses that it took a while for me to remember that for most people, success and happiness in life comes from developing strengths. Here’s […]

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This is a post from a few year back that remains highly relevant, so I thought I’d repost: Teenagers and young adults with Asperger’s Syndrome or with High Functioning Autism need some targeted and extra help understanding and negotiating romantic and sexual relationships. Moving from Social Skills or Social Thinking/Cognition curriculums to dating, sex, love, […]

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A child-friendly space in Mosul, Iraq. Photo: Arete/War Child UK. A group called War Child based in the UK, dedicates itself to helping children and families in war-torn areas all over the world. In In this Good.is article we see one of its projects, bringing mobile learning and libraries to children in desperate need. So […]

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One of the more controversial education conversations I hear and have been a part of concerns labeling kids. Over the years I’ve met lots of parents and teachers who argue that labeling is a negative thing. I’ve been to lots of dinner parties where, as soon as someone discovers my profession, the subject comes up, […]

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Whole Foods- great. Whole Wheat- for some, great. Whole Language (as a reading strategy for kids with dyslexia)- sounds good, right? If it’s “whole” it must be good. Wrong! Well-done post from Dyslexia Training Institute For Those with Dyslexia, Whole Language is a Coping Mechanism, Not a Strategy The moral of the story is that […]

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From NPR’s series, Fifty Great Teachers This piece, Among Dartmouth’s Lathes And Saws, Lessons In Creativity focuses on a woodworking teacher at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire. I love how he seems unaware, or unconcerned (and hence, unencumbered with “trying”) of how what he does works. And just is the type of teacher who has […]

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A study was recently published that claims learning to read and improvement in reading ability has a positive effect on intelligence overall. Where to begin? First, getting past sensational science related headlines takes effort. I have an educated and beginners mind when it comes to reading research. I read through this study slowly, and appears […]

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“Dr. Collin Diedrich has a Ph.D in Molecular Virology and Microbiology from the University of Pittsburgh. He is currently a 2nd year postdoctoral fellow at the University of Cape Town in South Africa. His research focuses on how HIV increases individuals susceptibility to tuberculosis. Collin has aspirations to become an advocate for people with learning […]

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I came across this piece written by someone with Asperger’s Syndrome. She makes some important points to consider concerning the judgmental implications of terms such as “high functioning and low functioning.” I’m a fan of precise and descriptive diagnostic work, but the writer points out the subtle and unspoken judgements that accompany some of our […]

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