Archive for the 'Discussion Topics' Category

For me, one of the best parts of doing an evaluation for learning and learning disabilities has been going over the results, including the test score numbers with the student and his/her family. I’ve learned how to discuss the data and what it all means, in clear language so it makes sense to the student […]

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The myth that having dyslexia automatically means you’re either a) artistic, b) have visual-spatial talents, c) have other gifts that are part of and caused by your dyslexia, can minimize or distract us from struggling with the proven risks of shame and school-based trauma. Results of these can be devastating. Some people with dyslexia are […]

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  I’ve been tracking and have been a part of the changing attitudes about learning disabilities. Historically there have been two major paradigms, or main description types. On the one hand there’s been an attitude over the past decade or so, that in spite of the school struggles, having a learning disability somehow meant you […]

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  1. Be Real This is the essence of connection. Inspiring kids and helping instill confidence isn’t about only being positive or trying to be inspirational. Being real and authentic is what gets you where you want to go with your kids. In any close and effective relationship, you must be brave in this way. […]

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Working with kids is about the best thing I could ever do and I’ve been lucky to do just that for my whole work life. Starting out working with kids in Australia, I began to see that children and teenagers were pretty much the same no matter where. Now that we’re living in Cuenca Ecuador […]

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Sir Ken Robinson has famously spoken about the terrible lack of creativity in educational and intellectual society and institutions. He jokes with some degree of black humor that watching a disco full of Ph.D’s is to watch a group of disembodied heads, lacking a sense of kinesthetic, artistic and social/emotional competencies. He castigates our educational […]

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In my opinion, coming to grips with the number of teenagers with addictions who also have learning disabilities (estimates towards 60%), requires understanding how isolating it can be. School stress is often the number one stress teenagers face, and when you’re struggling extra hard in the core competencies of academic success, it’s not hard to […]

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This is a post from a few year back that remains highly relevant, so I thought I’d repost: Teenagers and young adults with Asperger’s Syndrome or with High Functioning Autism need some targeted and extra help understanding and negotiating romantic and sexual relationships. Moving from Social Skills or Social Thinking/Cognition curriculums to dating, sex, love, […]

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The Sun or The Moon? Sometimes I feel like a bit of a downer and in contrast to other popular LD-centered websites, because a fair amount of my writings, posts and presentations concerns the risks and vulnerabilities that can go along with having a learning disability or learning difference. It’s a little out of character […]

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One of the more controversial education conversations I hear and have been a part of concerns labeling kids. Over the years I’ve met lots of parents and teachers who argue that labeling is a negative thing. I’ve been to lots of dinner parties where, as soon as someone discovers my profession, the subject comes up, […]

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                      Sitting at a desk alongside two of his grandchildren, Kimani Maruge first attended school in 2004 at the age of 84.   Great examples of older people living joyfully and with purpose. In this article from Positive.News featuring ballet dancing, athletics, art, and going to […]

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Lost in My Mind This article (link above) hit home, and is one of the best and most honest accounts of the reality that many kids, teens, and adults with dyslexia face. Even a successful athlete, reaching the pinnacle of his sport (a Stanley Cup winner) Brent Sobel wasn’t immune from feeling “not good enough” […]

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