Archive for the 'News' Category

Diana Hanbury King in about 1972. “The time to diagnose dyslexia is before the child has a chance to fail at reading,” she said. Photo Credit: Laura Gilpin Diana King, a giant in the field of dyslexia passed away last week at her home in CT. Here is the article from the NY Times By […]

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Awareness of dyslexia, illiteracy and remediation continues to spread throughout the world. In this article, Nigeria: Easing Dyslexia in Children to Develop Full Potential, Director of Dyslexia Nigeria, Mrs. Adrienne Tikolo discusses illiteracy in Nigeria and efforts to train teachers. In Nigeria, most people don’t know of dyslexia. Most times when a child is struggling […]

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A child-friendly space in Mosul, Iraq. Photo: Arete/War Child UK. A group called War Child based in the UK, dedicates itself to helping children and families in war-torn areas all over the world. In In this Good.is article we see one of its projects, bringing mobile learning and libraries to children in desperate need. So […]

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                      Sitting at a desk alongside two of his grandchildren, Kimani Maruge first attended school in 2004 at the age of 84.   Great examples of older people living joyfully and with purpose. In this article from Positive.News featuring ballet dancing, athletics, art, and going to […]

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Nike Runner and Chief Designer on his sense of  dyslexia and design. Nike designer says dyslexia is a gift YOU HAVE A LOT OF LOOSE BITS OF PAPER AND SKETCHES IN THIS OFFICE. WHAT DO YOU LIKE TO DRAW? Sneakers, body sketches, architectural retail spaces. I’m dyslexic, so my first real language was drawing. I […]

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From NPR Series “Been There” Adjusting to college campus life can be particularly challenging when you struggle with the mechanics of social life because of underlying social thinking challenges endemic to students on the Autism Spectrum. Life On Campus When You’re On The Autism Spectrum

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From NPR’s series, Fifty Great Teachers This piece, Among Dartmouth’s Lathes And Saws, Lessons In Creativity focuses on a woodworking teacher at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire. I love how he seems unaware, or unconcerned (and hence, unencumbered with “trying”) of how what he does works. And just is the type of teacher who has […]

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David Schenck, founder of the Schenck School, an Atlanta area school for dyslexic students, passed away last week. I’d visited this school on a tour of Georgia area schools and was impressed. The Schenck school has been a leader in the field for many years. From the article and other descriptions I’ve heard of Mr. […]

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A study was recently published that claims learning to read and improvement in reading ability has a positive effect on intelligence overall. Where to begin? First, getting past sensational science related headlines takes effort. I have an educated and beginners mind when it comes to reading research. I read through this study slowly, and appears […]

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Of course it’s exciting news that early intervention works. But, the magic is in the details. In this study, parents were coached to pay attention to subtle signs from their children (with autism) that they previously missed. When parents have seemingly non-responsive infants (not cooing, engaging in reciprocal eye gazing, etc) the adult often feels […]

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Researchers found that oxytocin, the hormone heavily involved in social connectivity and feelings of warmth towards others, is not lacking in people with autism spectrum disorder. Oxytocin Isn’t Lacking In Children With Autism, Researchers Say Instead, the study found that oxytocin levels affected social functioning in both kids with autism and typical kids. “As your […]

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You’re never too old to understand yourself better. Lisa Ling, journalist, discovers more about her brain and learning style.

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